baby sleep

If getting your infant to sleep through the night sounds like a dream-come-true, sleep training might be in your future. Here are the basics of ...

baby sleep

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baby sleep 👍how to baby sleep for for 1 last update 2020/07/11
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Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Sleep > How to Keep Your Sleeping Baby Safe: AAP Policy Explained
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baby sleep 👍how to baby sleep for ​By: Rachel Y. Moon, MD, FAAP

More than 3,500 babies in the U.S. die suddenly and unexpectedly every year while sleeping, often due to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or accidental deaths from suffocation or strangulation.

In an effort to reduce the risk of all sleep-related infant deaths, the American Academy of Pediatrics''s airway anatomy and the gag reflex will keep that from happening. Even babies with gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) should sleep on their backs.

  • Newborns should be placed skin-to-skin with their mother as soon after birth as possible, at least for the first hour. After that, or when the mother needs to sleep or cannot do skin-to-skin, babies should be placed on their backs in the bassinet.  While preemies may need to be on their stomachs temporarily while in the NICU due to breathing problems, they should be placed on their backs after the problems resolve, so that they can get used to being on their backs and before going home.

  • Some babies will roll onto their stomachs. You should always place your baby to sleep on the back, but if your baby is comfortable rolling both ways (back to tummy, tummy to back), then you do not have to return your baby to the back. However, be sure that there are no blankets, pillows, stuffed toys, or bumper pads around your baby, so that your baby does not roll into any of those items, which could cause blockage of air flow.

  • If your baby falls asleep in a car seat, stroller, swing, infant carrier, or sling, you should move him or her to a firm sleep surface on his or her back as soon as possible.

  • Use a firm sleep surface. A crib, bassinet, portable crib, or play yard that meets the safety standards of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is recommended along with a tight-fitting, firm mattress and fitted sheet designed for that particular product. Nothing else should be in the crib except for the baby. A firm surface is a hard surface; it should not indent when the baby is lying on it. Bedside sleepers that meet CPSC safety standards may be an option, but there are no published studies that have examined the safety of these products. In addition, some crib mattresses and sleep surfaces are advertised to reduce the risk of SIDS. There is no evidence that this is true, but parents can use these products if they meet CPSC safety standards.

  • Room share—keep baby''s crib, bassinet, portable crib, or play yard in your bedroom, close to your bed. The AAP recommends room sharing because it can decrease the risk of SIDS by as much as 50% and is much safer than bed the 1 last update 2020/07/11 sharing. In addition, room sharing will make it easier for you to feed, comfort, and watch your baby.Room share—keep baby''s crib, bassinet, portable crib, or play yard in your bedroom, close to your bed. The AAP recommends room sharing because it can decrease the risk of SIDS by as much as 50% and is much safer than bed sharing. In addition, room sharing will make it easier for you to feed, comfort, and watch your baby.

  • Only bring your baby into your bed to feed or comfort. Place your baby back in his or her own sleep space when you are ready to go to sleep. If there is any possibility that you might fall asleep, make sure there are no pillows, sheets, blankets, or any other items that could cover your baby''s parent.

  • The surface is soft, such as a waterbed, old mattress, sofa, couch, or armchair.

  • There is soft bedding for 1 last update 2020/07/11 like pillows or blankets on the bed.There is soft bedding like pillows or blankets on the bed.

  • Keep soft objects, loose bedding, or any objects that could increase the risk of entrapment, suffocation, or strangulation out of the baby''s OK if your baby doesn''t like them. If the pacifier falls out after your baby falls asleep, you don''t smoke anywhere near your baby, even if you are outside.

  • baby sleep 👍how to baby sleep for Do not use alcohol or illicit drugs during pregnancy or after the baby is born. It is very important not to bed share with your baby if you have been drinking alcohol or taken any medicines or illicit drugs that can make it harder for you to wake up.

  • Breastfed babies have a lower risk of SIDS. Breastfeed or feed your baby expressed breast milk. The AAP recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for your baby for about 6 months. Even after you add solid foods to your baby''s motor development and prevents flat head syndrome. See Back to Sleep, Tummy to Play for more information and ways to play with the baby during tummy time.

  • Use Caution When Buying Products 

    • Use caution when a product claims to reduce the risk of SIDS.  Wedges, positioners, special mattresses and specialized sleep surfaces have not been shown to reduce the risk of SIDS, according to the AAP.  

    • baby sleep 🔴how to baby sleep for Do not rely on home heart or breathing monitors to reduce the risk of SIDS. If you have questions about using these monitors for other health conditions, talk with your pediatrician.

    • There isn''t recommend for or against these products because there have been no studies that have looked at their effect on SIDS or if they increase the risk of injury and death from suffocation.

    Additional Information & Resources:

     

    About Dr. Moon:

    Rachel Y. Moon, MD, FAAP is a pediatrician and SIDS researcher at the University of Virginia. She is also the Division Head of General Pediatrics and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Her research centers on SIDS and SIDS risk factors, particularly in high risk populations, such as African-Americans and infants attending child care. Within the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), she is chair of the Task Force on SIDS and Associate Editor for the journal Pediatrics. Dr. Moon is also the editor of Sleep: What Every Parent Needs to Know.

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    Article Body
    the 1 last update 2020/07/11 AuthorAuthor
    ​By: Rachel Y. Moon, MD, FAAP
    Last Updated
    2/10/2020
    Source
    American Academy of Pediatrics (Copyright © 2016)
    baby sleep 👍how to baby sleep for The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.
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